Marco Brambilla
 

MEGAPLEX

 
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SYNC

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Sync is Brambilla’s first sampled video work which features three tightly edited sequences of film clips taken from fight scenes, sex scenes, as well as audience reactions from an archive of films. Running at up to 12 individual shots per second and projected on three suspended screens, the installation puts the viewer in a video crossfire; building violently to a state of sensory overload. Sync is a reflection of the rising threshold to graphic sex and brutality in contemporary popular culture and film. 

Three-channel video, color, sound, 01:43m, loop 

EXHIBITIONS 

CHRISTOPHER GRIMES GALLERY 

SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 

THE CANAL CHAPTER 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

SCREENINGS 

CANNES FILM FESTIVAL 

CANNES 

SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL 

PARK CITY UTAH 




COHAN AND LESLIE GALLERY 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

ARTCORE/FABRICE MARCOLINI 

TORONTO, CANADA 




SANTA MONICA MUSEUM OF ART 

SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 

LOUIS T. BLOUIN FOUNDATION 

LONDON, UK 

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APPROACH

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CYCLORAMA

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Filmed in 35mm time-lapse at nine revolving restaurants across North America, Cyclorama presents panoramic views side by side in a cylindrical enclosure that mimics the restaurants’ architecture, creating the sense of one continuous, moving landscape. 

The panoramas offer nine simultaneous sunrises, erasing time zones and providing a continuous 360-degree view of the western horizon. The installation reveals the revolving restaurant to be a paradox: wanting to be in many places at one time while desiring to duplicate a familiar moment. 

Nine-channel video installation, color, sound, 3:20s 

 
 
 
 
 
 

EXHIBITIONS 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 


EXIT ART 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

(CURATED BY KENNY SCHACHTER) 




THE ARMORY SHOW 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 




CHRISTOPHER GRIMES GALLERY 

SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 

 
 
 
 
 

WALL OF DEATH

 
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In the carnival act, Wall of Death a motorcyclist rides around the inside of a wooden drum, maintaining a delicate state of equilibrium between centrifugal force and gravity. The action is shot with a rotating camera mounted in the center of the drum as well as on a motorcycle tracking behind the rider. 

The editing technique was inspired by the Kinetoscope films popular during the time the act was widely performed in the 1930’s. The rider appears caught in a never-ending circle where his ability to remain upright is based on never stopping. Wall of Death explores the relation between time and speed in a world dependent on constant motion. 

Single-channel video, black and white, sound, 2:40s 

 
 

EXHIBITIONS 

NEVADA ART MUSEUM 

RENO, NEVADA 

CONTEMPORARY ARTS FORUM 

SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA 

CHRISTOPHER GRIMES GALLERY 

SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 


HENRY URBACH ARCHITECTURE 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

LA BOX 

LA BOX, BOURGES, FRANCE 

SANTA MONICA MUSEUM OF ART 

SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA 

 
 
 
 
 

HALFLIFE

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The 2002 multi-channel video installation, HalfLife juxtaposes surveillance video of gamers playing the popular video game Counter-Strike with a live video feed of the game world in which they are playing. The player’s expressions are seen from the cross-hairs’ point-of-view while the their virtual actions inside the game-world unfold in a progressively more violent and graphic video spectacle. A virtual cycle of life unfolds as characters are killed off in the game and disappear from the surveillance channel to be immediately replaced by the next player. 

The HalfLife installation included a third video channel of actual surveillance footage shot in a cyber-café in Garden Grove, California, where video surveillance systems were implemented by the City Council in 2004 to monitor a sudden increase in gang violence. 

Three-channel video, black and white, sound, 10m, loop